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Referring Veterinarians

When should I refer to the Ophthalmologist?

  • Ocular symptoms (blepharospasm, epiphora, change in eye appearance) for which the cause is not apparent, especially if unresponsive to therapy
  • Suspicion of glaucoma -- corneal edema, scleral injection, pupillary dilation, visual impairment
  • Corneal ulcers which are deep (>50% of the corneal depth) or non-healing (duration > 7 days) even if superficial
  • Ocular trauma -- proptosis, corneal or scleral laceration, foreign bodies, intraocular hemorrhage
  • Blindness or visual impairment, acute or chronic
  • Early evidence of cataracts -- examination prior to complete lens opacity allows for a fundus evaluation to detect evidence of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). Early detection and treatment of secondary lens-induced uveitis minimizes complications
  • Chronic inflammation (possible tumor, uveitis, lens luxation)
  • Early evidence of cataracts -- examination prior to complete lens opacity allows for a fundus evaluation to detect evidence of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). Early detection and treatment of secondary lens-induced uveitis minimizes complications
  • Conditions requiring surgery of the cornea or intraocular structures or eyelid reconstruction
  • If you have any questions regarding your case, please call. We are happy to provide courtesy telephone consultations.

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